Welcome Remarks

Thursday, November 3, 2016, 4:00pm – 4:15pm
Presented by Stephen Enniss
Located in Prothro Theater, Harry Ransom Center
In track Main Track

Keynote Address: “The Shadow of Slavery in American Public Life”

Thursday, November 3, 2016, 4:00pm – 5:30pm
Presented by Maurie McInnis
Located in Prothro Theater, Harry Ransom Center
In track Main Track

Across America, the physical structures of enslavement have been largely erased: slave quarters have fallen into ruin; the fields where people labored have been turned into housing developments; and the buildings where people were sold on the auction block have been replaced with skyscrapers. Nevertheless, slavery’s presence casts a long shadow over the landscape, both physically and metaphorically. Many buildings and landscapes still bear the scars of slavery, if you know now to read them, and national conversations are turning to the legacy of slavery in today’s racial climate. An important piece of confronting the nation’s original sin is an honest exploration of that past and its local resonances. McInnis’s lecture will address the role that historical scholarship can play in public conversations about race today by discussing two projects in Virginia that seek to make visible the history of enslavement where it had been previously erased from the landscape.

Introductory Remarks

Friday, November 4, 2016, 9:00am – 9:15am
Presented by Randy Diehl
Located in Prothro Theater, Harry Ransom Center
In track Main Track

Political Worlds

Friday, November 4, 2016, 9:15am – 10:15am
Presented by Nate Blakeslee, Bill Bush, Angie Maxwell, Phil Tiemeyer, and Kathie Tovo
Located in Prothro Theater, Harry Ransom Center
In track Main Track

We will begin the Political Worlds session by highlighting political issues that were key at the time the department was created 75 years ago. Using that historical moment as a jumping off point, panelists will address contemporary questions of citizenship, rights, and resistance. Finally, we will think through the ways in which American Studies has influenced the various political worlds represented on the panel.

Moderated by Elissa Underwood.

Mediated Worlds

Friday, November 4, 2016, 10:15am – 11:15am
Presented by Carly Kocurek, Rebecca Onion, Donn Rogosin, Siva Vaidhyanathan, David Wharton, and Allison Wright
Located in Prothro Theater, Harry Ransom Center
In track Main Track

From the printed word to the documentary and the digital landscape of the video game, American Studies scholars have historically utilized differing forms of media as both methods of investigation as well as subjects of critical analysis. Indeed, American Studies has arguably increasingly turned toward the area of the digital humanities not only as methodology, but as both object and archive. Mediated Worlds is a panel discussion on the interplay between American Studies and the production or investigation of differing forms of digital media.

Moderated by Eddie Whitewolf.

Pedagogical Worlds

Friday, November 4, 2016, 11:15am – 12:15pm
Presented by Patricia Bradley, Dwonna Goldstone, Matt Hedstrom, Benita Heiskanen, Charles Kupfer, and Jonathan Silverman
Located in Prothro Theater, Harry Ransom Center
In track Main Track

This panel explores the state of university teaching from a wide-ranging American Studies perspective. The panelists’ conversations will encompass both the local dynamics of student-teacher interactions and broader institutional pressures, touching on topics such as student debt and student expectations, the professionalization of university degrees, technology’s impact on teaching practices, the shifting dimensions of graduate education, and getting students to engage with uncomfortable topics and challenging material in the classroom. With teaching experiences in a truly diverse range of disciplines and contexts, the panelists will discuss how their American Studies backgrounds have shaped their approaches to these challenges, but they will also offer perspectives on how American Studies can better address the most pressing issues that liberal arts teachers face across disciplines and departments.

Moderated by Andrew Gansky.

Lunch

Friday, November 4, 2016, 12:15pm – 1:30pm
Located in Prothro Theater, Harry Ransom Center
In track Main Track

Curating Worlds I

Friday, November 4, 2016, 1:30pm – 2:30pm
Presented by Alicia Barber, Tim Davis, Frank Goodyear, Nancy Baker Jones, Jim McNutt, and Jason Mellard
In track Main Track

American Studies fosters critical and multidisciplinary approaches that can be adopted across many fields and spaces. The folks included in this panel and the next are actively engaged in the programming and interpretation of American cultural history through academic institutions, museums, and heritage initiatives. Through the depth and breadth of their experience, we can better grasp the many vital ways that historical thinking and critical seeing are vital in cultivating public understanding of the complexities of US cultural history and everyday life.

Moderated by Natalie Zelt.

Curating Worlds II

Friday, November 4, 2016, 2:30pm – 3:30pm
Presented by Cindy Brandimarte, Francine Carraro, Joel Dinerstein, Chi Elliott, Danielle Brune Sigler, and Jan Todd
Located in Prothro Theater, Harry Ransom Center
In track Main Track

American Studies prepares public scholars for work in many fields, including historical preservation, art and history museums, publishing, and education. In this panel, we will continue the discussion from the previous session, focusing on the many public roles our panelists fill as they take their work outside of the academy. We will consider the ways that academic training in American Studies influences exhibitions, public programs, and publishing projects on a range of topics, from Texas wildlife to poetry, portraiture to physical culture, museum programming to exhibition design.

Moderated by Emily Roehl.

Worlds of Higher Education

Friday, November 4, 2016, 3:30pm – 4:30pm
Presented by Emily Cutrer, Laura Hernández-Ehrisman, Katherine Feo Kelly, Raymund Paredes, Maureen Reed, and Carolyn Thomas
Located in Prothro Theater, Harry Ransom Center
In track Main Track

American Studies is shaped by the landscape of higher education, both as a field at large and through the specific colleges and universities that make up our institutional homes. Participants on this panel work in ways that bring them into direct conversation with this landscape. Panelists intersect with the world of higher education in a variety of ways, but their diverse experiences offer an opportunity to discuss several key questions: How does American Studies fit within the world of the university? How does that world influence our field and work? And how are we positioned, as American Studies scholars, to engage with and reimagine higher education?

Moderated by Caroline Pinkston.