Back in the Day: Notes on Science Before the Scientific Revolution

Friday, March 8, 2013, 10:00am – 12:00pm
Presented by Sir Francis Bacon, and Pythagoras of Samos
Located in Commons Atrium
In track Science
Sponsored by Beform

The science of the middle ages was significant in establishing a base for modern science. The Marxist historian and scientist J. D. Bernal[9][10][11] asserted that “the renaissance enabled a scientific revolution which let scholars look at the world in a different light. Religion, superstition, and fear were replaced by reason and knowledge”.[12] James Hannam says that, while most historians do think something revolutionary happened at this time, that “the term ‘scientific revolution’ is another one of those prejudicial historical labels that explain nothing. You could call any century from the twelfth to the twentieth a revolution in science” and that the concept “does nothing more than reinforce the error that before Copernicus nothing of any significance to science took place”.[13] Despite some challenges to religious views, however, many notable figures of the scientific revolution—including Nicolaus CopernicusTycho BraheJohannes KeplerGalileo Galilei,Francis BaconRené DescartesIsaac Newton and Gottfried Leibniz—remained devout in their faith.[14]

Friday, March 8, 2013, 10:00am – 12:00pm
Presented by Sir Francis Bacon, and Pythagoras of Samos
Located in Commons Atrium
In track Science
Sponsored by Beform